Friday, May 30, 2008

context and photography

While walking over the overbridge over the train tracks, I saw the rail tracks glistening with the light of yellow signal. The yellow long lines dividing the dark into equal twos, textured and raw, with the smell of metal and sweat of urban nation. The east side dark ended with jagged edges of station roof - the undulating continuity of shades of gray and grime. the west side dark went on only until the pillar standing in between me and it.

Then a bird came and sat over the signal. Almost in dark. The light from signal of no consequence to it (apart from possible heat of the metal on its feet). Still its black eyes managed to shine a dark shine against its black body.

I so wanted to capture the moment into a photograph framed thus - the focus on the bird pirched on signal. though the tracks visible just as well, and so is the dark. essentially, to capture the whole experience of being there, but I couldn't do it. U have to have a central focus in a pic to give meaning to it. Thats the predominant thought. People ooh n aah (and so do I :D) to pics depicting sharply focused pics with interesting subjects. However, I see a possibility of photographs absorbing the whole of scenario and then 'somehow' allowing for photographer to identify the object of the photograph, maybe many objectives in one. and while doing so, I don't want any loss of information of surrounding, so comparative tinting, burring etc are out of question.
Read my entry about innovations in visual data presentation in my digital nativity blog here. and now, there seems to be a possibility of this objective of mine being fulfilled. Hopefully, we will have instruments akin to cameras that could do that, instead of me having to take several pictures.

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